Category Archives: Technology

Candidate Websites: The Good, Okay and Non-Existent

Like many Vermont citizens, I’ve been frustrated with the continuing saga of Vermont Health Connect (don’t bother clicking until November 15th, after the election).  Although, I am neither a VHC insurance customer or healthcare provider, my hope is for better access to healthcare and cost containment.  But as a taxpayer, it is not acceptable to see such results for the tax dollars spent.  It does not matter that it came from our federal pocket instead of our Vermont pocket; a tax dollar is a tax dollar.  As someone who works in the Information Technology field, and has seen the pros and cons of IT outsourcing over the years, it’s not completely surprising or unexpected, whether the customer is a business or government agency.

Given that it is election season, politicians have expressed their frustration with the so-called “Nothing Burger” that is VHC.  Not that many of these politicians and candidates have ever actually built a website, I share their exasperation.  The humorous comments I’ve heard have been along the lines of “it’s just a website” and “any teenager could build a better website than CGI”.  What VHC is attempting to do is beyond “just a website”.  VHC is supposed to be a web portal site with a back-end network of web applications and services amongst the State of Vermont, federal agencies and insurance company systems.  But “website” is how politicians and news reports describe it.

vhc_down_4maintVermont Health Connect (until November 15th)

This got me thinking about the websites of candidates.  How well do their websites or social media sites perform or provide useful information to voters and constituents?  There are many ways that candidates interact with citizens, including debates, forums, door-to-door, ads, postcards, flyers and public access TV segments.  A website is just one aspect of the overall campaign, yet it is a very important tool.  For younger voters and newer residents of Vermont, a website can help reach those voters.

So I began looking at Vermont Senate candidate websites, as there are a lot fewer candidates to review than the House.  With 55 candidates for 30 seats, this was a good sample to start with.  I gathered some information and website links into a spreadsheet, then created a webpage summarizing Senate candidate websites and social media sites.

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Is Technology Taxing School Budgets?

As the Vermont school district consolidation debate rages on (H.883), I would like to focus for a moment on technology, and how it might relate to rising education costs.  Are recent technology mandates for new assessment rules impacting school budgets this year?  How sustainably has technology been applied to education since Act 60/68 began?

During the ongoing healthcare reform debate there have been reports indicating that one of the big drivers of rising healthcare costs is technology.  Technology can be a “mixed blessing”.  While technology has led to rising costs, it could also be used to lower costs, if implemented effectively.

Could technology, with its continuous upgrading of software, hardware, networks, spam filters, security patches, and ever-more tools be having a similar affect on our education costs?  Is technology a “mixed blessing” in education?  Are we effectively utilizing technology to advance learning and reduce costs?  Or are we merely chasing the latest trends, sales pitches, reform ideas, and making the willing IT companies more profitable?

I am not a Luddite by any means.  I’ve worked in the Information Technology field since 1977, mostly as a computer programmer, and with many types of databases.  I am very familiar with the constant churn of learning and adapting to new software and hardware, and occasional rehashes or mashups of previous tech ideas, but now with more “cutesy” names.  A friend of mine, a retired database admin, joked to me about “The Cloud”.  He said, “We used to call it a ‘Data Center’.”

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