Tag Archives: Congress

Congress Beats War Drum, Time to Play Another Tune

I was able to watch most of Ken Burn’s documentary on PBS about “The Roosevelts”.  All four of Teddy Roosevelt’s sons volunteered for WWI. His youngest son, Quentin died in the war. Also, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four sons served overseas on WWII.

Since the mid-1960s, the percentage of veterans in Congress has fallen from the 60-70% range to less than 25%.  Today there are a few younger members of Congress who served in Iraq or Afghanistan.  But most in Congress beat the War Drums to send other people’s children to war.

As awful as the beheading of the two U.S. journalists by ISIS is, let’s not forget that there have been similar murders in Mexico by drug gangs in the past decade.  Beginning over 20 years ago, there have been a handful of beheading cases in Detroit, mostly drug gang related. The main difference is that these cases were discovered after the fact, and were not broadcast on Twitter.  They occurred in North America, and not “over there” in the Middle East.

While “something” should be done regarding ISIS, war alone is not the answer. The more the world’s nations can work together, and make ISIS into a pariah, that is despised by most other Muslims in the world, only then things might improve. While the 2003 War in Iraq certainly was not helpful to this situation, it is not solely the problem or fault of the U.S.

Remember, 18 of 19 terrorists on 9/11 were from Saudi Arabia. Yet Bush/Cheney, friends of the Saudis, instead invaded Iraq.

The best that the Saudis can do, apparently so far, is provide training space for “moderate” rebels of Syria. Well, we can probably count the number of “moderates” in Congress on two hands.  So what makes us think we can actually find sufficient numbers of rebels from Syria, whom we could actually trust?

Saudi Arabia has the world’s 4th largest military. Why aren’t they offering to fly over “The Lavant” and attack ISIS?  Is it because they are both Sunni? Saudi Arabia, a very wealthy oil state, should at least pony up for the jet fuel for the war planes of the U.S. and other nations.

Unless Middle Eastern nations put forth significant effort towards diplomatic, humanitarian and military assistance, then we have no business getting embroiled in another “murky” situation in Iraq and Syria.  If neighboring countries in that region don’t offer sufficient help, then we should tighten our security, and begin to address the many domestic issues that already threaten us at home.

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Premature Death: Memories and Loopholes

On the morning of September 11th, 2001 (9/11), I remember where I was when I heard that a plane hit the World Trade Center.  I was driving along Route 103, commuting to work.  By the time I reached Chester, I heard another radio report, a second plane hit the towers.  I’ll bet many of you remember the details of that day, especially the thoughts and feelings you had when you learned of the second plane crash.

For a period of time, Americans came together and mourned for our 3000-plus citizens whose lives were taken prematurely.  Most Americans, at least initially, supported the War in Afghanistan.  But when it came to dealing with terrorism by invading Iraq in 2003, the American public became divided, yet again.

I remember where I was when I read about the young innocent children who lost their lives in Newtown, CT on December 14th, 2012 (12/14).  I didn’t find out until my lunch hour.  I had just logged out of my email, and then saw the headline.  “Oh God, not another shooting!”.

Again, the nation came together to mourn.  But when it comes to figuring out how to prevent, or at least minimize the amount of premature death that occurs in our country, we as a people find ourselves divided again.  If we are not pitted against a foreign enemy, we seem to turn in on our fellow citizens, our neighbors.

Speaking of premature death, many Americans (including myself) attended Good Friday service and remembered the story of Jesus’ Passion.  Twelve Fourteen was a “Bad Friday” for the families and citizens of Newtown, CT, and all Americans.  For Christians, on Easter we celebrate Christ’s Resurrection, overcoming death and (our) sin.  But can America as a nation turn the Newtown tragedy, and other gun deaths, into something positive?

This week is the 45th anniversary of the premature death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, TN by an assassin’s bullet, on April 4th 1968.  Within seven days after Dr. King’s assassination, the U.S. Congress and President Lyndon B. Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which provided for equal housing opportunities regardless of race, creed, or national origin.

Since Twelve Fourteen, it has been 111 days.  Other than speeches, press conferences, hearings, devisive partisan debates and reader comment forums, things are pretty much the status quo, except for in states like Colorado and Connecticut.

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Premature Death: American Lives and Sensible Gun Legislation

Here are some things I’ve been pondering (well before Sandy Hook, and Tucson, AZ and VA Tech, but since 9/11):

If Americans are killed by box-cutter wielding foreign terrorists, most of our elected politicians know exactly what to do:

Invade the wrong country (Iraq).

If Americans are killed by other gun wielding Americans, most of our elected politicians know exactly what to do:

Run away from the NRA and Wayne LaLaLaPierre, blame video games and movies, and complain instead about drones.

How many Americans have been killed by drones on American soil since December 14th, 2012?

I don’t know, but maybe Sen. Rand Paul knows the number.

How many Americans have been killed or attacked by video game wielding Americans since December 14th, 2012?

Maybe a handful of people were beaten with an X-Box or PlayStation controller, who knows?

How many Americans have been killed by gun wielding Americans since December 14th, 2012?

Count as of March 7, 2013: (at least) 2,635 known gun related deaths (gun-wielding Americans killing other Americans), via crowd-sourced data collected from Slate and Twitter (@GunDeaths).

Gun Deaths in America since December 14th, 2012:

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/crime/2012/12/gun_death_tally_every_american_gun_death_since_newtown_sandy_hook_shooting.html

America has a “PREMATURE DEATH” problem.  Too many Americans are dying needlessly while our politicians do very little, or are afraid to even debate the topic.  It seems that our nation’s leaders handle this problem differently if the murderers are foreign versus domestic.  Will an adult, sensible debate and vote on gun-related “premature death” happen in Congress?  Or, will any proposed legislation itself succumb to “Premature Death Syndrome” in Congressional committees?

Any political party or politician in 2014 and beyond who continues to claim that “they are better at protecting us” than their opponent party or candidate, is full of “Shaving Cream” (Benny Bell lyrics).